The Neglect of Long-Term Care

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(via USA Today)

Click here to read all posts in our Care Work series. 

Allison K. Hoffman—

Caregiving has long been shunted aside and undervalued in the United States. Long-term care (LTC) is no exception. Sometimes called “long term services and supports,” LTC is the help that over 40 million Americans who are sick or disabled need every day to complete basic tasks like bathing, eating, getting dressed, going to the bathroom, paying bills, or buying groceries.

American social welfare policy has largely ignored LTC, and families, who are largely left to manage it on their own, increasingly strain to meet loved ones’ needs. This problem will only worsen with the collapse of private insurance for long-term care and the large number of people with dementia-related conditions.

Resistance to developing social policy to help people with LTC comes in two main forms: First, some people say the problem of designing public support for LTC is too big to solve. Second, others suggest that it’s not a problem at all—caregiving is just what families do, so the state need not intervene. Neither of these arguments holds up well. Continue reading

Medicare for All: How to Reduce Inequality in the Long-Term Care Market

Medicare for All: How to Reduce Inequality in the Long-Term Care Market

This post is part of our symposium on Medicare for All. You can find all the posts in the series here.

Ruqaiijah Yearby – 

Medicare for All has the potential to address gaps in access to quality long-term care services for the elderly by mitigating some of the inequities in the market for long-term care. It could do this by increasing reimbursement rates for long-term care, fostering competition between long-term care providers, and improving federal enforcement of non-discrimination requirements.

In the long-term care services market, the issue is not private insurance versus single payer because the government already finances most long-term care services through Medicare and Medicaid (Medicaid is the primary payer for long-term services and supports ranging from institutional care to community-based services). Instead, the issue is who will provide the care: institutions or home- and community-based providers.

Continue reading