The Constitutional Role of Economic Coordination Rights

This post is part of our series on the political economy of labor & the constitution. You can find all of our posts on this topic here.

Sanjukta Paul –

Arizona Teachers Go On Strike And March To State Capitol

(via Jacobin)

There’s a common notion that pervades legal and policy debate—including among fairly liberal Democrats—that collective bargaining mechanisms, and even public coordination of markets through minimum wages and working conditions, distort market outcomes and are therefore inefficient (though they may be justified by countervailing considerations). This position immediately sets up a kind of presumption against labor coordination or public coordination of markets to benefit workers, a presumption analytically and normatively supported by Law and Economics.

Too often, progressive and even left responses have been limited to asserting that considerations other than efficiency should be balanced with efficiency concerns—we should balance fairness, or humanitarian concerns, with efficiency for example; or worker voice, living wages, and so forth are indeed efficient because they correct market failures. Some critiques rely heavily on the idea that labor is different from other commodities, which can imply that we can understand everything else as a potential commodity.

While these approaches often have merit, the Law & Political Economy orientation should attend to deeper critiques of L&E emanating from fields such as economic sociology and heterodox microeconomics. These critiques call into question the coherence of basic theoretical assumptions that are indispensable to L&E’s prescriptions about what is efficient in the first place. For example, many economists now challenge the idea that prices are determined according to orthodox microeconomic assumptions, and that these “market prices” in turn maximize welfare by allocating resources in an optimal manner; a number of sociologists, meanwhile, emphasize the indispensable role of social coordination in markets.

Also, Law & Political Economy itself can pose a powerful internal challenge to L&E, by reviving and updating the old legal realist insight that all markets are legally constructed, and by applying that insight in the weeds of particular areas of law that today have been all but given up to L&E. Relatedly, the Legal Realist move of displaying, in detail, the historical contingency of certain rules of law takes on especial importance in the context of an analytic framework like L&E, which assumes certain market rules that are given by law, but also often ignores legal contingencies and treats law as derivative of independent economic principles.

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A Law and Political Economy Agenda for Labor and the Constitution

This post is part of our series on the political economy of labor & the constitution. You can find all of our posts on this topic here.

Kate Andrias

Arizona Teachers Go On Strike And March To State Capitol

(via Jacobin)

At the end of September, labor law scholars gathered at a conference focused on “Labor and the Constitution: Past, Present, and Future.”  There, a group of us considered the problem of “Political Economy and the Constitution”—and the extent to which the Law and Political Economy (LPE) analytical frame can be useful in building a more democratic and egalitarian future for workers.

As readers of this blog know, LPE represents an emerging approach in legal scholarship—or at least a return to an old approach that had long been dormant.  Yet, in contrast to other areas of the legal academy, attention to questions of economic power never disappeared from view in labor law.  Maybe more than in any other field, people who study the history of the workplace and workers’ position in society have long recognized the importance of power. They have been acutely aware of connections between the political and the economic, between markets and law. Continue reading

A Political Economy the Constitution Requires

Join us this week for a series on the political economy of labor & the constitution. 

Willy Forbath –

Arizona Teachers Go On Strike And March To State Capitol

(via Jacobin)

“Political economy” has an antique ring. More than a century ago, the field of “political economy” began to give way to what was called “economics.” By the mid-twentieth century, political economy was forgotten; economics ruled the roost. But what is old is new again. Political economy is coming back. Economics sidelines the distribution of wealth and power; political economy puts it at the center. Economics claims to be value-free; political economy asks: “What is the good economy?”

Because it blends the normative with the analytical and the economic with the political, political economy always has lent itself to constitutional discussion. And when you go back to the eighteenth , nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, you find that judges, lawmakers, reformers, advocates, constitution-makers and policy-makers of all stripes looked at and argued about the Constitution through a political economy lens and the political economy through a constitutional lens.

They started from the premise that the Constitution was inevitably entwined with – and not neutral with respect to – the economic order. Thus, many matters that we see as policy debates about the maintenance or reform of institutions affecting the distribution of wealth and economic power they saw as the stuff of constitutional law and politics.

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AB5: Regulating the Gig Economy is Good for Workers and Democracy

Veena Dubal –

Poverty is not a suspect classification under our Constitution, but it is an affront to life and dignity and to democracy more broadly.  With the evisceration of the U.S. welfare state and the judiciary’s deference to political outcomes in the area of “economics and social welfare,” employment is the primary legal and political means to address economic inequality. In turn, employment is—for better or for worse—key to our democracy.  It provides access to the tools for basic sustenance in modern America: the minimum wage, health insurance, safety net protections, and even the right to organize and collectively bargain. Our capacity to participate in life and partake in politics, depends, in no small part, on our employee status. In the words of political theorist Judith Shklar, We are citizens if we ‘earn.’”  To this observation, I might add that we are citizens if we earn enough.

AB5—a bill which was just signed into law in California—is the first state law in the country to push back against an alarming trend of the last half decade: the use of app-based technology to proliferate work outside the regulatory framework of “employment.”  The potential for labor platforms relying on non-employee labor to exacerbate poverty looms large in debates about the future of work and of workers.  While the number of app-based workers remains comparatively small, the potential for this sector to grow and for industries to reproduce this model across the service economy looms large.

AB5 is the first significant step in pulling these workers back under the “employee” umbrella. It codifies the presumption of employee status under state law and puts forth an exacting, conjunctive test that hiring entities must meet if they wish to engage workers as non-employees.  Because labor platforms have posed risks to employment regimes and the security of workers the world over, the bill has been internationally lauded and states across the U.S. seek to replicate it.

How did California manage to pass this law, and what implications might AB5 hold for the relationship between work, poverty, and democracy more broadly?

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