Friday Roundup

The latest in LPE World:

– LPE Blog

Friday Roundup

Greetings, friends!

Recent media that might be of interest:

  • For a look at market fundamentalism through the story of The Economist magazine, check out this article from the New Yorker.
  • book review of Bhaskar Sunkara’s The Socialist Manifesto: The Case for Radical Politics in an Era of Extreme Inequality
  • See the October 31 episode of Doug Henwood’s podcast, covering the ongoing social upheaval in Chile
  • In case you missed it, an extended interview with historian Donna Haraway on “Truth, Technology, and Resisting Extinction”
  • A review of Sandra G. Mayson’s article Bias In, Bias Out, on racially biased algorithmic risk assessments that government actors have used to inform decisions in criminal investigations and proceedings

Additionally, if you’d like a grant to research whether and how inequality affects economic growth and stability, the Washington Center for Equitable Growth has just announced its 2020 Request for Proposals. Their core areas of interest are: human and capital well-being, the labor market, macroeconomic policy, and market structure.

– LPE Blog

Friday Roundup

Here are some things we’re reading:

  • Last week on the blog, we continued our series on labor and the Constitution.
  • This week, we featured highlights from LPE student organizing.
  • These days in Rawls: a review in the New Republic of Katrina Forrester’s book In the Shadow of Justice by Jedediah Purdy, and a review in Commonweal on theology and liberalism by Samuel Moyn.
  • In a review for the Nation, Kate Aronoff skewers the liberal tendency to obfuscate central planning and corporate power in favor of moralizing and self-flagellation.

-LPE Blog

 

Friday Roundup

What’s good in LPElandia?

  • This week on the blog, we featured Allison Tait’s take on teaching Trusts and Estates from an LPE perspective.
  • An interview with political scientist Alex Gourevitch on the history of labor republicanism in the United States over at The Dig.
  • Gabe Winant wrote on the political valence of being in the “professional-managerial class” at n+1.

And an Upcoming ACS Event in DC:

Income inequality has taken center stage in America’s political debate. As the 2020 presidential election heats up, candidates on all sides of the political divide are tapping into feelings of economic anxiety fueled by a disappearing middle class and increased concentrations of wealth. Indeed, the continually rising gap between the rich and everyone else has fueled unrest across the globe and has shown itself to have a corrupting effect on democracy itself. Labor law, antitrust law, and tax law all offer potential avenues to help increase wages, grow the middle class, deconsolidate corporate power, and shrink the racial wealth gap. What policy proposals should be on the table? Would increasing antitrust enforcement help? Could a wealth tax be the answer to growing inequality? What changes to labor law might help reduce income disparities? And perhaps most importantly, what constitutional potholes should advocates make sure to avoid as they go about this work?
Panelists are Lisa Cylar Barrett (Director of Policy at LDF), Lina Khan (Counsel, U.S. House Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial, and Administrative Law), Anne Marie Lofaso (West Virginia College of Law), and Ganesh Sitaraman (Vanderbilt Law). Nicole Berner, SEIU General Counsel will moderate.
-LPE Blog