LPE at RebLaw!

If you’re at (or on your way to) RebLaw, you should definitely go to the two events hosted by LPE student groups on Saturday! To wit,

10:15 a.m. in Room 129: “Reclaiming Our Legal Education: Alternatives By and For Progressive Law Students” (a panel featuring current law students and practitioners)

12:00 p.m. in Room 127: “Bringing LPE to Your Campus” (a breakout group for students interested in creating a home for LPE on their campus)

 

Friday Roundup

We’re sure at least a couple links in this long list of LPE-related content will garner a click:

Happy reading/listening!

Welcome JustMoney.org!

just moneyLPE is thrilled to welcome JustMoney.org into the LPE ecosystem, and to share this message from the Just Money team: The website aims to provide a platform for exploration of money and credit as matters of design.  We  approach them and their larger architecture as legal institutions that are crucial dimensions of governance in modern societies.


JustMoney.org will serve a number of functions, including a feed of scholarship posts (abstracts and links to recent publications and working papers); roundtables (invited exchanges among commentators on breaking or critical topics like banking and money creation, virtual currencies, race and the monetary architecture, and the debate over funding the Green New Deal); policy spotlights (short, student-authored columns about current policy ideas), teaching and resources (an archive of syllabi, course materials, other teaching materials), and announcements (event notices, CFPs, job postings, and similar items).

We invite you to browse the site.  We would be happy to post relevant syllabi and course materials – just send them, along with comments, questions, and ideas to editor@justmoney.org.   Please spread the word, by tweet or traditional media – we’d like the website to serve a broad community!  Note that each post on our JustMoney.org website has a Twitter icon at the bottom that you can select to retweet the post on your own Twitter feed, a great way of getting the word out. You can also visit and follow our @justmoneyorg Twitter feed. If you know people that would like to subscribe to receive email updates from JustMoney.org, please refer them to our signup form.

Just Money will also host a conference on Money as a Democratic Medium in December 2020. From the organizers: A bit more than a year ago, many of us gathered at the Conference on Money as a Democratic Medium.  We aimed at a territory that is critical to political communities:  the design of money and credit, understood as collective projects that configure much of material life and political power, along with economic norms, social practices, and conceptual space.  The Conference began a conversation that many participants wanted to continue and expand.

Monday Roundup

We’ve been so chock full of posts that we haven’t had the time to round them up! Since our last round up, we’ve hosted two symposia:

The LPE in Europe Symposium, with

Ioannis Kampouraksis’s introductory meditation on what might travel the trans-Atlantic wire,

Federico Fornasari’s consideration of the relationship between environmentalism and European corporate law,

and Laura Dominique Knöpfel’s analysis of the way that global value chains have destabilized accountability mechanisms for European corporations.

and

The Care Work Symposium, with

Irene Jor’s account of why and how the National Domestic Worker’s Alliance builds power,

Eileen Boris’s exploration of the relationship between domestic/care work and environmentalism,

Robyn Rodriguez’s contextualization of domestic work and care work in a global racial capitalism framework,

Allison Hoffman’s discussion of the necessity for a policy for long-term care in the United States,

and Noah Zatz’s call for big structural reform of the political economy of care work economy.

 

In addition, we featured posts from:

Sarah Quinn on the way that social problems become financial problems through credit policy,

Joseph Fishkin on the bad arguments against access to medical care as a basic right,

Frank Pasquale on the shift to structural concerns in the “second wave of algorithmic accountability”,

and Tendayi Achiume on reconceptualizing migration as part of the project of decolonization.
In this coming week, we will round out our LPE in Europe symposium. Next week we will begin a new symposium on global value chains. Stay tuned to find out if we will also be able to shimmy in another round up before the new year.

Join LPE at Law & Society 2020

Join LPE at the Law & Society Conference in 2020 as we expand the Law and Political Economy CRN (55)!

There are only two and half days left to apply to the Law and Society Association (LSA) Conference, which will be held in Denver, Colorado, May 28 – May 30, 2020. All paper, panel, and session proposals must be submitted to the LSA by November 20 (11:59pm EST). Please submit your proposal directly to LSA through the portal at https://www.lsadenver2020.org/ As outlined below, we invite you to use our Collaborative Research Network (CRN 55) for Law and Political Economy which will allow us to minimize scheduling conflicts and highlight papers and panels related to Law and Political Economy themes at the conference.

Corinne Blalock (corinne.blalock@yale.edu) and Luke Herrine (luke.herrine@yale.edu) are co-chairing the LSA Conference Committee for the CRN, so please feel free to reach out to them with any questions!

Instructions for Applying to LSA as Part of the Law & Political Economy CRN

1. Background Information on the CRN.  We take a broad view of the scope of Law and Political Economy. All scholars with an interest in law and political economy are welcome to participate in our CRN’s events.  Presenting your paper as part of the CRN’s program generally means a better fit for your paper and a larger audience than leaving it to the larger program committee, and helps foster connections between our participants.

2. How to Join the Law and Political Economy Program for the 2020 Conference.  At the LSA conference in Denver, we hope to continue and expand the conversation with another series of panels and events.  To this end, we have identified several options for CRN members to submit papers and panels:

a. Submit a Complete Panel or Roundtable Proposal.  If you have organized a complete panel or roundtable session, please submit it directly to the LSA and select “CRN 55: Law and Political Economy” from the drop-down menu on the submissions page.  The LSA website details the submission process: https://www.lsadenver2020.org/types-of-submissionsPlease note that selecting CRN 55 is very important because it will help the LSA to schedule our panels in a way that minimizes conflicts. It is wise to include at least 5 paper abstracts in case someone has to cancel before the conference, because sessions with less than 4 papers may be moved to a “roundtable” that may be banished to a terrible room where nobody can hear each other speak.

b. Submit an “Author Meets Reader” Session for a Recent Book.  These sessions can be organized for books with a copyright in 2019 or later and require participation of the author, a chair, and a max of 2 readers.

c. Submit a Paper to be Placed in a Panel on the CRN. If you have a paper to submit, please submit it directly to the LSA and select “CRN 55: Law and Political Economy” from the drop-down menu on the submissions page. LSA will then send all papers under this CRN to us, and we will organize them into panels. The LSA website details the submission process: https://www.lsadenver2020.org/types-of-submissionsPlease note that selecting CRN 55 is very important. If you do not, you will not be included in any LPE panels.

Friday Roundup

The latest in LPE World:

– LPE Blog

Friday Roundup

Greetings, friends!

Recent media that might be of interest:

  • For a look at market fundamentalism through the story of The Economist magazine, check out this article from the New Yorker.
  • book review of Bhaskar Sunkara’s The Socialist Manifesto: The Case for Radical Politics in an Era of Extreme Inequality
  • See the October 31 episode of Doug Henwood’s podcast, covering the ongoing social upheaval in Chile
  • In case you missed it, an extended interview with historian Donna Haraway on “Truth, Technology, and Resisting Extinction”
  • A review of Sandra G. Mayson’s article Bias In, Bias Out, on racially biased algorithmic risk assessments that government actors have used to inform decisions in criminal investigations and proceedings

Additionally, if you’d like a grant to research whether and how inequality affects economic growth and stability, the Washington Center for Equitable Growth has just announced its 2020 Request for Proposals. Their core areas of interest are: human and capital well-being, the labor market, macroeconomic policy, and market structure.

– LPE Blog

Friday Roundup

Here are some things we’re reading:

  • Last week on the blog, we continued our series on labor and the Constitution.
  • This week, we featured highlights from LPE student organizing.
  • These days in Rawls: a review in the New Republic of Katrina Forrester’s book In the Shadow of Justice by Jedediah Purdy, and a review in Commonweal on theology and liberalism by Samuel Moyn.
  • In a review for the Nation, Kate Aronoff skewers the liberal tendency to obfuscate central planning and corporate power in favor of moralizing and self-flagellation.

-LPE Blog

 

Friday Roundup

What’s good in LPElandia?

  • This week on the blog, we featured Allison Tait’s take on teaching Trusts and Estates from an LPE perspective.
  • An interview with political scientist Alex Gourevitch on the history of labor republicanism in the United States over at The Dig.
  • Gabe Winant wrote on the political valence of being in the “professional-managerial class” at n+1.

And an Upcoming ACS Event in DC:

Income inequality has taken center stage in America’s political debate. As the 2020 presidential election heats up, candidates on all sides of the political divide are tapping into feelings of economic anxiety fueled by a disappearing middle class and increased concentrations of wealth. Indeed, the continually rising gap between the rich and everyone else has fueled unrest across the globe and has shown itself to have a corrupting effect on democracy itself. Labor law, antitrust law, and tax law all offer potential avenues to help increase wages, grow the middle class, deconsolidate corporate power, and shrink the racial wealth gap. What policy proposals should be on the table? Would increasing antitrust enforcement help? Could a wealth tax be the answer to growing inequality? What changes to labor law might help reduce income disparities? And perhaps most importantly, what constitutional potholes should advocates make sure to avoid as they go about this work?
Panelists are Lisa Cylar Barrett (Director of Policy at LDF), Lina Khan (Counsel, U.S. House Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial, and Administrative Law), Anne Marie Lofaso (West Virginia College of Law), and Ganesh Sitaraman (Vanderbilt Law). Nicole Berner, SEIU General Counsel will moderate.
-LPE Blog

Reminder: LPE Conference Proposals due Sept 15

Just a reminder that paper and panel proposals for the LPE Project’s Conference, “Law and Political Economy: Democracy After Neoliberalism” (April 3-4, 2020, at Yale Law School) are due one week from today, September 15. You can find the call for papers here

One clarification: Panel proposals should include a description of the panel as a whole and abstracts for each paper. Each of those pieces can be up to a page in length (e.g., a proposal for a 4-person panel could be up to 5 pages).

We really hope you will join us!