A Torts Course for the Actually Existing World

John Fabian Witt –

The torts classroom is like a dystopian historical fantasy.

Or maybe a kind of morbid historical science fiction. Students and teachers gather to rehearse time-honored rituals around the Great Cases of human tragedy: Scott v. Shephard, Brown v. Kendall, Rylands v. Fletcher, Vosburg v. Putney, Leroy Fibre v. Chicago, Milwaukee, & St. Paul Railway, MacPherson v. Buick, Murphy v. Steeplechase Amusement Co., Palsgraf v. Long Island Railroad, and more. The cases tend to be old. They tend to involve railroads. We conjure up a bygone world on the rails or at old-school amusement parks, in coal mines or at small-town markets. We conjure a world of judges, juries and appellate opinions, too. But in the actual world outside the torts classroom, railroads have been in decline for a half-century and more. Amusement parks, too, though that’s a story for a different day. More importantly here: so have judges, juries, and appellate opinions. The spread of waivers, the rise of arbitration, the disappearance of the trial, and the prevalence of settlement have made the Great Cases almost literally things of the past.

What would it mean to bring the torts class into the twenty-first-century and connect it to actually existing problems?

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