Medicare for All and Medicare for America: What Are We Fighting Over? Part II

This post is part of our symposium on Medicare for All. You can find all the posts in the series here. You can view Part I of this article here.

Christina S. Ho – 

Screen Shot 2019-07-22 at 8.33.16 AM

In yesterday’s post, I evaluated Medicare for All and considered some of the implications of a single-payer system. Today’s post will assess the Medicare for America bill, which, by contrast, is a public option.  This label may not appear obvious, and is even disputed by some, since the bill sunsets the Affordable Care Act (ACA) exchanges and individual private health insurance.  Instead, it enrolls the majority of Americans in a public Medicare plan with benefits close to what Medicare for All would offer.

While the Medicare for America bill is arranged with great promise and enormous care, its real significance lies not in this snapshot description but in the distributional and politico-historical dynamics that its opt-out structure unleashes over time.

Continue reading

Medicare for All and Medicare for America: What Are We Fighting Over? Part I

This post is part of our symposium on Medicare for All. You can find all the posts in the series here.

Christina S. Ho – 

The early contours of the health care debate have featured a loose divide between those favoring so-called “single-payer Medicare for All,” and those who propose some kind of “public option.”

Screen Shot 2019-07-22 at 8.33.16 AMTo drill down to what’s really at stake, I looked at the leading and most detailed proposals representing these two basic outlooks.  To understand “single-payer Medicare for All,” I read the “Medicare for All Act of 2019,” H.R. 1384 introduced by Reps. Pramila Jayapal and Debbie Dingell, which largely tracks the Senate counterpart introduced by Bernie Sanders.  I also looked at the most ambitious and developed “public option” proposal, the “Medicare for America Act of 2019,” H.R. 2452, sponsored by Reps. Rosa DeLauro and Jan Schakowsky and drawn in part from the Center for American Progress’ (CAP) Medicare Extra for All plan.

I argue that there may not be as much of a difference between the two plans as the Presidential primary camps will be motivated to portray, and I want to lay out why – with the caveat that at this stage of the debate, no one’s views should be immune from revision, least of all mine.

Continue reading